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Preventive Health for Women

Maintaining your health is one of the most important things to keep up with. People need preventive check-ups to make sure they're staying on top of their health. One may be wondering where to even start, so we're here to help! The first step is to schedule an appointment with your Primary Care Provider. If you do not have one, click here to get help finding one. Below is a table for preventive health measures to make sure you have the health knowledge you need to stay happy and healthy.

Preventive Care by Age

Age 30-39

Physical Examination

Every two years, you should have a check-up so your provider can assess your overall health. Your provider may ask you questions relating to your family's medical history to keep an eye out for risks of diseases like heart disease, diabetes and cancer. A comprehensive physical exam can also include many of the screenings listed below, so consider it an opportunity to attend to a lot of health to-dos at one time.

Blood Pressure Screening

One of the most important tests you can have in your 30s is a blood pressure test. This easy test is done as often as your provider sees fit. You can even take it at home to keep up with it. This test can help you decrease your risk of death or disability from heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. Healthy blood pressure is 120/80. High blood pressure and hypertension are indicated by higher readings on a blood pressure test. Most people don't know that they have high blood pressure, so it is important to keep up with your blood pressure to reduce your risk of a stroke and heart attack. The good thing is that you're in your 30s, so you are young enough to make the changes necessary to keep you healthy in the future!

Pap Smear and Pelvic Exam

Pap smears and pelvic exams are both used to screen for cervical cancer. It is recommended to have a Pap smear every three years, or every five years if you combine it with the HPV test.

Cholesterol Screening

It is important to have regular cholesterol screenings if you have a family history of heart disease, have diabetes, smoke tobacco and/or are overweight. High cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the United States. Keeping up with your cholesterol levels can help you stay in control of your health. A blood draw at our lab will be able to tell you what your cholesterol levels are. A blood draw can also be ordered by your provider.

A cholesterol screening checks your levels of “good” HDL cholesterol, “bad” LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Your LDL should be less than 100mg/dL. Your HDL 40mg/dL or higher.

Diabetes Screening

Diabetes can impact anyone at any age. The important thing is to catch it early on. Type 2 diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs when your body produces insulin, but it’s no longer as effective in processing sugar in your blood. If you are overweight, have high blood pressure or suffer from other health problems, your doctor may want to screen you for diabetes.

Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Screening

Screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea in all sexually active women 24 years or younger and in women 25 years or older who are at increased risk for infection is recommended.

Age 40-49

Physical Examination

Every two years, you should have a check-up so your provider can assess your overall health. Your provider may ask you questions relating to your family's medical history to keep an eye out for risks of diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. A comprehensive physical exam can also include many of the screenings listed below, so consider it an opportunity to attend to a lot of health to-dos at one time.

Blood Pressure Screening

One of the most important tests you can have in your 40s is a blood pressure test. This easy test is done as often as your provider sees fit. You can even take it at home to keep up with it. Healthy blood pressure is 120/80. If your blood pressure is on the high side-between 120-139 on top and 81-90 on the bottom-you should have your blood pressure checked yearly. High blood pressure and hypertension are indicated by higher readings on a blood pressure test. Most people don't know that they have high blood pressure, so it is important to keep up with your blood pressure to reduce your risk of a stroke and heart attack.

Cholesterol Screening

High cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the United States. Keeping up with your cholesterol levels can help you stay in control of your health. A blood draw at our lab will be able to tell you what your cholesterol levels are. A blood draw can also be ordered by your provider.

A cholesterol screening checks your levels of “good” HDL cholesterol, “bad” LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. Your LDL should be less than 100mg/dL. Your HDL 40mg/dL or higher.

Diabetes Screening

Diabetes can impact anyone at any age. The important thing is to catch it early on. Type 2 diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs when your body produces insulin, but it’s no longer as effective in processing sugar in your blood. If you are overweight, have high blood pressure or suffer from other health problems, your doctor may want to screen you for diabetes.

Cervical Cancer Screening

Pap smears and pelvic exams are both used to screen for cervical cancer. It is recommended to have a Pap smear every three years, or every five years if you combine it with the HPV test.

Breast Cancer Screening

A mammogram is a safe, accurate diagnostic test that helps trained experts spot abnormalities. The American College of Radiology recommends that women over age 40 have mammograms on a yearly basis. Learn more about breast screenings at Good Samaritan by clicking here.

Colorectal Cancer Screening

The risk of colorectal cancer increases with age and 90% of cases are diagnosed in those 50 years of age and older. If you have risk factors for colon cancer like a family history of colon cancer, you may want to start screening even earlier. Be sure to talk with your provider about any risk factors that you may have.

Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that adults without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) use a low to moderate-dose statin for prevention of CVD events and mortality when all of the following criteria are met:

  • They are aged 40 to 74 years
  • They have one or more CVD risk factors (ie, dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension or smoking)
  • They have a calculated 10-year risk of a cardiovascular event of 10% or greater

Identification of dyslipidemia and calculation of 10-year CVD event risk requires universal lipids screening in adults aged 40-75. Speak with your provider for more information on lipids screenings and the assessment of cardiovascular risks

Age 50-59

Physical Examination

Every two years, you should have a check-up so your provider can assess your overall health. Your provider may ask you questions relating to your family's medical history to keep an eye out for risks of diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. A comprehensive physical exam can also include many of the screenings listed below, so consider it an opportunity to attend to a lot of health to-dos at one time.

Blood Pressure Screening

This easy test is done as often as your provider sees fit. You can even take it at home to keep up with it. Healthy blood pressure is 120/80. If your blood pressure is on the high side-between 120-139 on top and 81-90 on the bottom-you should have your blood pressure checked yearly. High blood pressure and hypertension are indicated by higher readings on a blood pressure test. Most people don't know that they have high blood pressure, so it is important to keep up with your blood pressure to reduce your risk of a stroke and heart attack.

Cholesterol Screening

High cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the United States. Keeping up with your cholesterol levels can help you stay in control of your health. A blood draw at our lab will be able to tell you what your cholesterol levels are. A blood draw can also be ordered by your provider.

A cholesterol screening checks your levels of “good” HDL cholesterol, “bad” LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. Your LDL should be less than 100mg/dL. Your HDL 40mg/dL or higher.

Diabetes Screening

Diabetes can impact anyone at any age. The important thing is to catch it early on. Type 2 diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs when your body produces insulin, but it’s no longer as effective in processing sugar in your blood. If you are overweight, have high blood pressure or suffer from other health problems, your doctor may want to screen you for diabetes.

Cervical Cancer Screening

Pap smears and pelvic exams are both used to screen for cervical cancer. It is recommended to have a Pap smear every three years, or every five years if you combine it with the HPV test.

Breast Cancer Screening

A mammogram is a safe, accurate diagnostic test that helps trained experts spot abnormalities. The American College of Radiology recommends that women over age 40 have mammograms on a yearly basis. Learn more about breast screenings at Good Samaritan by clicking here.

Colorectal Cancer Screening

Colon cancer rates in women younger than 50 have been rising, and experts now recommend screening for colorectal cancer beginning at age 45. If you have risk factors for colon cancer like a family history of colon cancer, you may want to start screening even earlier. Be sure to talk with your provider about any risk factors that you may have.

Hepatitis C Screening

Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that can cause liver failure and liver cancer. It’s caused by a virus, and many people have the virus without knowing it. Screening allows for treatment, which may prevent Hepatitis C from spreading to others and causing serious liver damage.

Lung Cancer Screening

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults aged 50 to 80 years who have a 20 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit smoking within the past 15 years. Screening should be discontinued once a person has not smoked for 15 years or develops a health problem that substantially limits life expectancy or the ability or willingness to have curative lung surgery.

Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that adults without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) use a low to moderate-dose statin for prevention of CVD events and mortality when all of the following criteria are met:

  • They are aged 40 to 74 years
  • They have one or more CVD risk factors (ie, dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, or smoking)
  • They have a calculated 10-year risk of a cardiovascular event of 10% or greater

Identification of dyslipidemia and calculation of 10-year CVD event risk requires universal lipids screening in adults aged 40-75. Speak with your provider for more information on lipids screenings and the assessment of cardiovascular risks

Age 60+

Cervical Cancer Screening

Pap smears and pelvic exams are both used to screen for cervical cancer. It is recommended to have a Pap smear every three years, or every five years if you combine it with the HPV test.

Breast Cancer Screening

A mammogram is a safe, accurate diagnostic test that helps trained experts spot abnormalities. The American College of Radiology recommends that women over age 40 have mammograms on a yearly basis. Learn more about breast screenings at Good Samaritan by clicking here.

Physical Examination

Your physical examination continues to be the foundation for your health. It is important to keep up with your regular check-ups. These physicals will continue to include routine, in-office screenings. Depending on your medical history and concerns, your provider may refer you to a lab or another doctor for additional screening.

Blood Pressure Screening

An important test that needs to be routinely performed after the age of 60 is blood pressure screening. This easy test is done as often as your provider sees fit. You can even take it at home to keep up with it. Healthy blood pressure is 120/80. High blood pressure and hypertension are indicated by higher readings on a blood pressure test. Most people don't know that they have high blood pressure, so it is important to keep up with your blood pressure to reduce your risk of a stroke and heart attack.

Cholesterol Screening

High cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the United States. Keeping up with your cholesterol levels can help you stay in control of your health. A blood draw at our lab will be able to tell you what your cholesterol levels are.

A cholesterol screening checks your levels of “good” HDL cholesterol, “bad” LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Your LDL should be less than 100mg/dL. Your HDL 40mg/dL or higher. Make sure to keep up with cholesterol screenings with your provider.

Colorectal Cancer Screening

The screening identifies changes and abnormalities in your colon and rectum to allow for early detection of colon and rectal cancers. Be sure to talk with your provider about any risk factors that you may have.

Diabetes Screening

Diabetes can impact anyone at any age. The important thing is to catch it early on. Type 2 diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs when your body produces insulin, but it’s no longer as effective in processing sugar in your blood. By measuring blood sugar levels from a blood sample, your doctor can confirm a diagnosis or tell you if you’re at risk to develop the disease.

Fall Prevention

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends exercise interventions to prevent falls in community-dwelling adults 65 years or older who are at increased risk of falls.

Lung Cancer Screening

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in adults aged 50 to 80 years who have a 20 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit smoking within the past 15 years. Screening should be discontinued once a person has not smoked for 15 years or develops a health problem that substantially limits life expectancy or the ability or willingness to have curative lung surgery.

Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that adults without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) use a low to moderate-dose statin for prevention of CVD events and mortality when all of the following criteria are met:

  • They are aged 40 to 74 years
  • They have one or more CVD risk factors (ie, dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension or smoking)
  • They have a calculated 10-year risk of a cardiovascular event of 10% or greater

Identification of dyslipidemia and calculation of 10-year CVD event risk requires universal lipids screening in adults aged 40-75. Speak with your provider for more information on lipids screenings and the assessment of cardiovascular risks.